Korean Kimchi

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1 medium sized Chinese cabbage

2 handfuls of fine sea salt

Half an apple – peeled

1 small onion – grated

Small bunch of spring onions

3 cloves of garlic – minced

1 tablespoon Korean chilli powder or a mix of paprika and chilli powder

Soy sauce

Chop the cabbage into strips and chunks depending on your preference. 2cm wide is a good size, slightly smaller for the fleshy stem.

Layer the cabbage in a large bowl, sprinkling the salt over the layers as you go. Give the bowl a shake to distribute the salt.

Set aside for a couple of hours.

Chop up the apple, garlic and ginger and add the chilli powder (or paprika if using) and soy sauce.

Blend or process into a rough paste, add a little water if needed.

Chop the spring onions into 1cm lengths.

After a couple of hours ‘brining’ (sitting in the salt) mix together the cabbage and the paste, using your hands to work the paste into the leaves.

Sprinkle the chopped spring onions over the cabbage and stuff into a clean jar.

Leave at room temperature for approx. 2 weeks until the flavour is to your taste. Burp occasionally by opening the lid.

When the flavour is right for you, keep in the fridge to delay the fermentation process.

Method

Chop the cabbage into strips and chunks depending on your preference. 2cm wide is a good size, slightly smaller for the fleshy stem.

Layer the cabbage in a large bowl, sprinkling the salt over the layers as you go. Give the bowl a shake to distribute the salt.

Set aside for a couple of hours.

Chop up the apple, garlic and ginger and add the chilli powder (or paprika if using) and soy sauce.

Blend or process into a rough paste, add a little water if needed.

Chop the spring onions into 1cm lengths.

After a couple of hours ‘brining’ (sitting in the salt) mix together the cabbage and the paste, using your hands to work the paste into the leaves.

Sprinkle the chopped spring onions over the cabbage and stuff into a clean jar.

Leave at room temperature for approx. 2 weeks until the flavour is to your taste. Burp occasionally by opening the lid.

When the flavour is right for you, keep in the fridge to delay the fermentation process.

Ingredients

1 medium sized Chinese cabbage

2 handfuls of fine sea salt

Half an apple – peeled

1 small onion – grated

Small bunch of spring onions

3 cloves of garlic – minced

1 tablespoon Korean chilli powder or a mix of paprika and chilli powder

Soy sauce

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